An “insider” is any person who possesses at least one of the following:

1) access to valuable non-public information about a corporation (this makes a company’s directors and high-level executives insiders)

2) ownership of stock that equals more than 10% of a firm’s equity

A common misconception is that all insider trading is illegal, but there are actually two methods by which insider trading can occur. One is legal, and the other is not.

An insider is legally permitted to buy and sell shares of the firm – and any subsidiaries – that employs him or her. However, these transactions must be properly registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and are done with advance filings. You can find details of this type of insider trading on the SEC’s EDGAR database.

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